The Lark’s Project on Tyranny, Part 1: Rajiv Joseph

A few weeks ago I had the great honor of being asked to participate in a thrilling conversation at The Lark about how we as artists respond to the world around us. If you couldn’t join us in person, the first part of it is now available to watch online, and you can hear all about how Rajiv Joseph‘s play Guards at the Taj nearly incited a riot in a Russian theater.

And if you’re reading about this here, you’re probably asking, “Cool, cool, but Tim, when do I get to hear you?” Well, I was #5 in the line-up, so, you’re going to have to wait a bit. But seriously, you should watch the entire thing. Lloyd Suh was bloody brilliant in leading this conversation and it was so fascinating and inspiring to hear all these artists talk about their work.

 

Looking Ahead (and a little bit behind)

In 2018, I finally got around to writing On Every Link a Heart Does Dangle; or, Owed—my Oedipus adaptation that completely pushes Oedipus offstage, giving the story to the women of Thebes. Thanks to the Playwrights Center and the Lark, I wrote about 150 pages over the course of just 3 weeks.

And then I got to workshop that play TWICE at the Kennedy Center. The first time via the National New Play Network‘s MFA Playwrights Workshop—of which I’m an alumni—and the second time courtesy of the amazing Gregg Henry, artistic director of the KC’s American College Theater Festival.

Most exciting of all is that I’ll be workshopping Every Link at the Lark this spring via their BareBones program. This includes public performances, so be sure to stay turned for details as we put together our team.

Coming up on January 31, I’ll be participating in the Project on Tyranny. Along with Franky D. Gonzalez, C.A. Johnson, Rajiv Joseph, Mona Mansour, Liza Jessie Peterson, and moderator, Lloyd Suh, we’ll be discussing the ways in which art and activism come to intersect in these challenging times.

Cheers, y’all.

Last Workshop of my Jerome Fellowship

EC602122-8550-46F9-9291-8E76EE2829B2“The way forward is the Great River’s mouth…”

Once, the town of Thebes on the banks of the Mississippi River was the jewel of southern Illinois, but that was before the rains stopped falling and the crops didn’t come in and the babies started dying. Seeking an answer from the gods, suspicion falls on Mellie, a young woman, seriously disabled since birth, long suspected as being unfavored by them who dwell on the Mountaintops. Mellie has her own suspicions though and sets out to prove them before the hammer can fall on her.

This is On every link a heart does dangle; or, Owed, my second play exploring three generations of debts and deceptions in a mythological version of Thebes, Illinois. It’s receiving its first full read in a workshop at the Playwrights Center today, the first step on what should be an exciting, yearlong journey.

New short plays in 2018

Current-MoodArt.jpgHi friends, 2018 is off to an exciting start with 2 new short plays in production.

First up, “This Land Is MY Land” premieres at the 52nd St. Street Project as part of Current Mood: The Relatable Plays. This is one of the Project’s 2-on-2 shows where 2 kids act in a play written for them by an adult and directed by an adult. My play features two of my favorite kids at the Project, one of whom is Emmanuel, my Smart Partner. It’s a political satire set in 2049 at a moment when the country’s public lands are about to be privatized and two regular joes are fighting to make sure they get their constitutionally-guaranteed acre—but maybe they can overcome their differences by overthrowing the corrupt government instead?

And then—a grand start to life here in Minneapolis—my first collaboration with a local company here. The first play of Pillsbury House + Theater’s 2018 season is The Great Divide II: Plays on the Politics of Truth. The show consists of 5 plays by 5 playwrights local to Minneapolis and they’re 5 of my favorite people that I’ve met since moving here: Christina Ham, Jessica Huang, Stacey Rose, and Andrew Rosendorf. The show will be directed by Noël Raymond and features a cast of the Twin Cities’ best: Tracey Maloney, Audrey Park,  Mikell Sapp, & Ricardo Vazquez.

In NYC Working at the Lark

As part of my Apothetae-Lark Fellowship, I’m working on 2 plays at the Lark in NYC this week.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017:
We’ll read through the new, existing draft of Fault & Fold. Nicole A. Watson, directing.

After her tour of duty was ended by an act of violence, Sarah finds herself back home trying to figure out how to put her life back together. Back in Afghanistan, Khalid, the brother of the woman Sarah killed, is trying to do the same. Together they look for the ways to bridge the distances between one another, a journey that will cross continents and cultures and delve deep into the earth.

Monday, December 4, 2017:
I’ll be revisiting an older play, G-Men! with director Avery Wigglesworth, who helmed the production of Peloponnesus with her company The Cutout Theater.

Dateline: 1956, The Big City! Spcl. Asst. Deputy Director Norman and his crackerjack agents are on the trail of a mad, dress-wearing bomber who’s blowing up ladies’ clothing stores. Led by no less than J. Edgar himself, our heroes brave a world full of liberals and commies and foreigners-Oh my! They banter, they quip, they defy time & space and rewrite history. They are…G-Men!

“Assuming there are seagulls, assuming I’m near the sea…”

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Next up in 2016, aka the “Year of Tim J. Lord:”

“Uprooted,” a brand new 10-minute play written for the 52nd St. Project’s Teen Ensemble. Two performances only!

The other plays were written by Dylan Dawson, Christina Quintana, Erica Saleh, & Melisa Tien. Directed by Ka-ling Cheung, Rachel Dart, Austin Regan, Max Rosenak, & Lynne Rosenberg.

Tickets are free! Make your reservations here!

THIS IS HOW WE ROLL

The Teen Ensemble One-Act Festival

2 Performances
Friday, June 3 @ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 2 @ 3:00 p.m.

The 52nd Street Project’s
Five Angels Theater
789 Tenth Avenue, 2nd Fl.
Between 52nd & 53rd Streets

ThisIsHowWeRollWeb